SPRING/SUMMER 2018 CLASSES & SEMINARS

All Writing Workshops Dallas instructors are professional writers, teachers and editors, who have taught at major universities and attended top MFA programs across the country. Our instructors are dedicated teachers who have a passion for the craft of writing. Workshops are limited to eight writers. Students will have their work critiqued in class and will receive written feedback from the instructor and their classmates. Private consultations with the instructor will also be provided. 

Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below each class or seminar description to ensure there is still room in the class/seminar. Refund Policy: included in the price of each multi-week workshop is a $100 non-refundable enrollment fee, required for all multi-week workshops. If a student drops a multi-week workshop up to 5 days before the class starts, all but the enrollment fee will be refunded. After the 5-day grace period, there are no refunds, and students will be required to pay the full course fee. If a writer enrolls in one of our seminars and can't make it we will send you the link to the Live Stream along with all seminar materials so that you can watch the seminar at your convenience within 30 days of the seminar date. We have this refund policy because we keep our classes intentionally small. Dropping a class at the last minute or after the class starts means that someone else who wanted to be in the class cannot participate, and so we don't offer refunds after the 5-day grace period. For a writing workshop to function, enrolled students must be dedicated to the class.

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All returning writers receive a $25 discount on any course offering.

CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO NAVIGATE TO THE GENRE COURSE OFFERING OF YOUR CHOICE:

SEMINARS | FICTION | NON-FICTION | SCREENWRITING | POETRY | SPECIAL TOPICS

SEMINARS

Legal Issues for Writers

Sunday, April 29, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

Doesn't matter if you write books, articles, or screenplays, every writer must negotiate a minefield of legal issues on the road to publication or production.  Attorney Mike Farris, an expert in this field, will guide you through that minefield, addressing common questions that all writers have, plus some you may never have thought of.  Topics will include:

  • How, and why, to register your copyright
  • What is copyright infringement?
  • What is the “public domain”?
  • Defamation, invasion of privacy, and the right of publicity
  • The agency agreement
  • The publishing contract
  • How to obtain life rights
  • The option/purchase agreement for film rights/screenplays
  • How to protect your work when pitching to film producers
  • Collaboration agreements and works-for-hire

Attorney Mike Farris was lead attorney in the Fifty Shades of Grey litigation in Fort Worth that resulted in a $13.25 million judgment in favor of his client.  He negotiated the sale of film rights to The Free State of Jones for his client The University of North Carolina Press, which was made into a major motion picture starring Oscar-winner Matthew McConaughey and directed by multi-time Oscar nominee Gary Ross. Film rights to Mike's Hawaiian true crime book, A Death in the Islands: The Unwritten Law and the Last Trial of Clarence Darrow, have been optioned by Aaron and Jordan Kandell, two of the writers on the Disney hit Moana. Mike's next true crime book, Poor Innocent Lad: The Tragic Death of Gill Jamieson and the Execution of Myles Fukunaga, set in the Territory of Hawaii in 1928-1929, is set for release later this year. Mike is also the author of seven published novels, including thrillers such as The Bequest and Manifest Intent, and the Hawaiian historical fiction Isle of Broken Dreams.

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    • Mike Farris, Presenter
    • Sunday, April 29, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Click the button below to register for the seminar..

    Free Cocktail Meet & Greet - May 3rd

    Thursday, May 3rd, 2018 - 5:00PM TO 8:00PM

    Writing Workshops Dallas is hosting a FREE Cocktail Meet & Greet on May 3rd at The People's Last Stand at Mockingbird Station and we'd love to meet you! Come out if you're interested in talking to our faculty about our just-posted 2018 Summer Classes or if you just want to meet other writers in Dallas and talk shop. It doesn't matter if you're a current or former WWD student, we'd love for you to be part of this community. Our mission is to bring writers out of the wilderness and into community. In fact, we were founded on the basis that having a literary community is essential to the life of any creative writer.

    Finding a community is an important step that leads most writers to take their work and craft more seriously. We're proud to be part of the thriving literary scene in Dallas. If you've heard about Writing Workshops Dallas and would like to know more about us, come to The People's Last Stand on May 3rd from 5PM to 8PM and let us buy you a literary-inspired cocktail. We'd love to meet you, discuss your work and where you hope to be in your writing journey this time next year!

    RSVP below if you can make it and we'll have some drink tickets with your name on them. Until then, Happy Writing!.

    • Cost: FREE!
    • Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 5:00PM to 8:00PM
    • Free Cocktail Meet & Greet will be at The People's Last Stand at Mockingbird Station: 5319 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206

    Click the button below to RSVP for our FREE Cocktail Meet & Greet!

    Claiming Your Territory: Fiction or Memoir?

    Sunday, May 6, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

    This seminar will explore the formal and expressive possibilities—and limits—of fiction and memoir to address the question: Which genre might best serve the stories you want to tell, including the stories from your own life? The Nobel Laureate novelist Saul Bellow once said, “Fiction is the higher autobiography.” We’ll debate this claim and also consider the recent emergence of autofiction, a hybrid literary form that blurs if not erases the boundary between actual and imagined events. How might you exploit such boundary ambiguity to express your own felt experience, your voice, and the truth of your narrative? And what is truth in a literary context? Using, among other sources, the novelist Paul Auster’s compilation of true stories from NPR’s “National Story Project,” we’ll look at real-life narratives and then consider short fiction that corresponds to those narratives in plot and theme. As we analyze the qualities anchoring each genre, we’ll expand our sense of how the eye (perception of experience) and the mind’s eye (imagination) animate each one. We’ll generate our own fiction and nonfiction in the class, experimenting with how various elements—such as shape, voice/tone, and selective imagery—realize our intentions. We’ll also discuss:

    • The challenge of memory
    • The history of the tradition of blended literary genres
    • The classic writing advice to write what you know

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    Instructor Eden Elieff is a writer of fiction and nonfiction, a teacher, and private writing coach. She has published work in literary journals, the Dallas Morning News, and also been nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

    • Eden Elieff, Presenter
    • Sunday, May 6, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Click the button below to register for the seminar.

    Should I Self-Publish or Seek Traditional Publishing?

    Sunday, May 20, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

    Gone are the days when the gatekeepers of traditional publishing held the keys to the literary kingdom. Thanks to thriving self-publishing platforms like CreateSpace, Kindle Direct Publishing, Smashwords, and Draft2Digital, the barrier to entry for publishing your own book is negligible. But just because you can doesn’t necessarily mean you should. Yet, with so much wildly varying information available online, how can today’s author know whether self-publishing or traditional publishing is their best path forward? By asking themselves five simple yet challenging questions, which will all be covered in depth. This interactive seminar will also offer answers to:

    • What are the major differences between self-publishing and traditional publishing?
    • What are the benefits and drawbacks of each process?
    • How much does it cost to self-publish vs. traditionally publish?
    • How long does each process require?
    • How much could I earn through either process?
    • Should my decision depend on my genre?
    • Why is a platform essential for both processes?
    • Does a self-publisher have to do all of their work alone?
    • What’s it like to work with a traditional publisher?

    Instructor Blake Atwood is an author, editor, and ghostwriter who has been traditionally published as a co-writer and has self-published three books, including an audio book and Spanish editions of his first book. He also works with editing clients pursuing both paths. He is the host of the podcast, All Apprentices: Quick Editing Tips.

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    • Blake Atwood, Presenter
    • Sunday, May 20, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below.

    How to Find Your Plot: A Storytelling Seminar

    Sunday, June 3, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

    JR. Forasteros, author of Empathy for the Devil, will guide you through the twists and turns of writing a story that keeps your readers turning pages till they reach that killer ending. How do you decide what story to tell? What are the rules of the various kinds of stories, and when do you break them? We'll help you learn to structure your story for maximum impact, no matter how many zigs and zags it takes. JR. will help you craft the perfect plot to make your story shine. Topics will include:

    • The various kinds of plots from the monomyth to the unstory
    • How to create peril that's compelling and convincing
    • How to control pacing in a story
    • The importance of saving that cat (nearly) every time
    • Finding the right ending… and getting there believably

    Instructor JR. Forasteros is the author of Empathy for the Devil. He also blogs for NorvilleRogers.com and is a prolific podcaster. He leads an Awaken Creativity Writers' Group for Art House Dallas, and his writings have appeared in several essay collections, Grace and Peace magazine and Relevant magazine. JR. is also a pastor, training a team of volunteer preachers in writing for public speaking.

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    • JR. Forasteros, Presenter
    • Sunday, June 3, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Click the button below to register for the seminar.

    Submitting to Journals & Magazines

    A Publication Seminar

    Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

    So, you have one or two finished pieces of writing (a short story, an essay, a poem, a chapter) and are wondering what to do next. The world of publishing can be vague and intimidating—how do I know where to send my work? What is an SASE? What should my cover letter say? In this three-hour seminar, we’ll answer all of these questions and more. You’ll walk away with an understanding of who is publishing what, what the procedures are for sending out your work, how (and why) you should keep careful records, and how to begin compiling your own writing résumé. Publishing individual pieces, such as stories, essays, or poems, is the first step along the path toward publishing a full-length book. It’s not a process that you’ll want to miss or skip over, and by the end of this seminar you’ll know exactly why. If you’re ready to begin the process of becoming a published writer, you won’t want to miss one-time crash course.

    Instructor Mag Gabbert holds a PhD in creative writing from Texas Tech University and an MFA in creative writing from UC Riverside. Her work has appeared in The Rumpus, 32 Poems, Stirring, Carve Magazine, Sugar House Review and The Nervous Breakdown, among other places. She currently teaches creative writing for the Graduate Department of Liberal Studies at Southern Methodist University and serves as an editor for Iron Horse Literary Review.

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    • Mag Gabbert, Presenter
    • Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Click the button below to register for the seminar.

    Book Marketing 101

    A Recipe for Sizzling Sales

    Sunday, June 24, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

    Is your book marketing strategy a little bland? You’ve invested time, energy, sweat, and maybe some tears into writing your book. But without the right marketing strategy, you and your book will languish, never connecting with the readers (and reviewers) who need to find your work. Using digital tools, you can create a marketing recipe that will get your book noticed without giving you heartburn. In this practical, how-to filled session, you’ll learn to have fun with marketing while attracting and keeping loyal readers. The importance of creating a compelling author website and critical elements for producing a high-quality, marketing-worthy book will be discussed. We’ll also examine the best social media platforms for authors and how to use them to build reader engagement and drive book sales. Using email marketing strategies effectively, building a team of devoted book ambassadors, and establishing a true-to-yourself brand will also be covered. A marketing “recipe book” will be provided to each attendee to help build and execute a successful marketing plan. This seminar will cover:

    • Establish an author brand people love
    • Learn how to engage more effectively with social media communities
    • Build a loyal following of devoted book ambassadors
    • Overcome intimidation in this new marketing world
    • Get the answers to burning questions about book marketing
    • Leave with a recipe for a complete book marketing strategy

    Instructor Shayla Raquel is an expert editor, seasoned writer, and author-centric marketer. A lifelong lover of books, she has edited over 300 manuscripts and has launched several Amazon bestsellers for her clients. Shayla's award-winning blog teaches new and established authors how to write, publish, and market their books. She is the author of the Pre-Publishing Checklist and lives in Oklahoma with her two dogs, Chanel and Wednesday.

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    • Shayla Raquel, Presenter
    • Sunday, June 24, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Click the button below to register for the seminar.

    Self-Editing Seminar

    How to Self-Edit: 50 Essential Tips for Honing Every Manuscript

    Sunday, July 1, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

    As featured in D Magazine's "Five Things You Must Do in Dallas," this seminar, led by full-time editor and author Blake Atwood, will delve deep (or is it deeply?) into the challenging and robust (poor word choice) process of self-editing. You will learn specific, practical self-editing tips so you can present your most inrediblest (Are you even trying?) work to an editor, agent, publisher, or audience. You will also learn the differences between developmental editing and copyediting, how to know when you should stop self-editing, how to find and work with an editor, what you can expect to pay for professional editing, and what it’s like to work with an editor. This interactive seminar will help writers of all kinds, from novelists to nonfiction authors to poets to screenwriters. 

    As an included bonus, every student will receive a digital copy of Blake Atwood’s Don’t Fear the Reaper: Why Every Author Needs an Editor as well as a digital download of the seminar’s tips.

    Instructor Blake Atwood is an author, editor, and ghostwriter who has been traditionally published as a co-writer and has self-published three books, including an audio book and Spanish editions of his first book. He also works with editing clients pursuing both paths. He is the host of the podcast, All Apprentices: Quick Editing Tips.

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    • Blake Atwood, Presenter
    • Sunday, July 1, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Click the button below to register for the seminar.

    Story Craft: Mastering the Art of Promises & Payoffs in Fiction

    Sunday, July 8, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

    Great stories don’t happen by accident. The best writers understand the tools of the craft and use them to construct tales that surprise and satisfy their readers. To master these skills, writers must learn how to effectively make compelling story promises in their opening lines and pages as well as deliver surprising yet satisfying payoffs by THE END. In this workshop, you’ll learn about:

    • The tools that make effective and intriguing promises
    • Concrete examples of how bestselling authors use these tools in their stories
    • Delivering on your promises by effectively landing your payoffs
    • Tips for revision and working with these tools with your critique partners
    • How to apply these principles to your own work in progress with hands-on exercises

    Students will also receive worksheet templates they can use for current and future projects. This class is for writers at all levels. 

    Instructor Jaye Wells is a USA Today-bestselling author of nineteen speculative fiction books, including her most recent novel, High Lonesome Sound. She holds an MFA in Writing Popular Fiction from Seton Hill University. Learn more about Jaye at www.jayewells.com

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    • Jaye Wells, Presenter
    • Sunday, July 8, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Click the button below to register for the seminar.

    Criminal Minds: The Elements of Crime Writing

    Sunday, July 22, 2018 - 3:00PM TO 6:00PM

    Whether you’re writing historical fiction or contemporary crime novels, certain craft elements remain the same: an engaging plot, robust, multi-dimensional characters, pacing and building tension with the narrative.  This three-hour class will focus on effective strategies for writing exciting stories in the crime and mystery genre, where the demands for sustained tension and creative and unique narratives are the keys to writing a killer story.   There will be time for short writing exercises, and participants are encouraged to bring their own short stories, or outlines and extracts from their novels-in-progress for discussion of what’s working, and what’s not.

    • Building durable, robust characters that can carry the action
    • The distillation of dialogue, authentic to time and place
    • Narrative pacing
    • Maintaining suspense for your readers
    • Dynamic conflict resolution

    Instructor Kathleen Kent’s fourth book, titled The Dime, is an Edgar-nominated contemporary crime novel set in Dallas. The New York Times picked The Dime as one of their “Latest and Greatest” in crime fiction, March 2017.  The second book in the Detective Betty series will be published by Mulholland Books in the spring of 2019.  The Dime has been optioned by 20th Century Fox for a TV series, produced by J.J. Abrams and Matt Reeves. Ms. Kent is also the author of three bestselling historical novels, The Heretic’s Daughter, The Traitor’s Wife, and The Outcasts.

    Fee: $60 or $45 for former/current students | Live Stream Available!

    • Kathleen Kent Presenter
    • Sunday, July 22, 2018 - 3:00PM to 6:00PM
    • Seminar meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206
    • Live Stream is available for students who live outside of Dallas. Just let us know when you register.

    Click the button below to register for the seminar.

    FICTION CLASSES

    8-WEEK FICTION I/II SECTION 001 - CLASS BEGINS Monday, June 4, 2018

    6 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    This workshop is built for fiction writers at any point in their journey (beginners through intermediate), both short story writers and novelists. Led by Blake Kimzey, named one of D Magazine's Artists to Learn From in 2018, the class is designed to make you a better reader and writer of short fiction. The course focuses on teaching the fundamental techniques of fiction writing, with in-class workshopping of student manuscripts and discussion of some assigned outside reading. We’ll use Ron Carlson's concepts of inner story, outer story, and narrative inventory and focus on fundamental techniques of fiction, including plot, characterization, scene, setting, dialogue, timeline, and point of view. Each week we’ll focus on craft and discuss published work, though the central focus of each class meeting will be the discussion of student work. Student fiction will be workshopped in a supportive, respectful, and constructively critical environment with the goal of improving an individual’s voice and vision for their piece via traditional elements of craft.

    Each writer will have two opportunities to have his or her work critiqued in class (up to 25 pages each time) and will receive typed feedback from both the instructor and his or her classmates. A private conference with the instructor is included. This course is OPEN to EXPERIENCED writers who want a refresher course on the basics of craft and the function and role of the workshop.

    NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of Thrill Me: Essays on Fiction by Benjamin Percy and City of Thieves by David Benioff as the foundational texts for this course.

    Instructor Blake Kimzey founded and directs Writing Workshops Dallas. His short fiction has been broadcast on NPR, performed on stage in Los Angeles, and published by Tin House, McSweeney’s, VICE Magazine, Redivider, Green Mountains Review, Short Fiction, FiveChapters, The Lifted Brow, Hobart, Puerto del Sol, The Los Angeles Review, The Masters Review, Booth, Faultline, FLAUNT Magazine, Malibu Magazine, Day One, Fiction Southeast, Surreal South '13, and selected by Pulitzer Prize-winner Robert Olen Butler for inclusion in The Best Small Fictions 2015. He is a graduate of the MFA Program at UC Irvine and currently teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Texas at Dallas.

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • Blake Kimzey, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 8 students
    • Meets Mondays 6:30PM to 9:00PM / June 4, 2018 to July 30, 2018 (Note: Class does not meet June 18th)
    • Class meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    8-WEEK FICTION I/II SECTION 002 - CLASS BEGINS Tuesday, June 5, 2018

    6 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    This workshop is built for fiction writers at any point in their journey (beginners through intermediate), both short story writers and novelists. Led by Blake Kimzey, named one of D Magazine's Artists to Learn From in 2018, the course is designed around in-class workshopping of student manuscripts and discussion of some assigned outside reading. We'll study Benjamin Percy's craft essays, which will help students write stories with narrative momentum without sacrificing literary merit or voice. Each week we’ll focus on craft and discuss published work, though the central focus of each class meeting will be the discussion of student work. Student fiction will be workshopped in a supportive, respectful, and constructively critical environment with the goal of improving an individual’s voice and vision for their piece via traditional elements of craft.

    Each writer will have two opportunities to have his or her work critiqued in class (up to 25 pages each time) and will receive typed feedback from both the instructor and his or her classmates. A private conference with the instructor is included. Students are required to purchase a copy of Thrill Me by Benjamin Percy as the foundational text for this course.

    NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of Thrill Me: Essays on Fiction by Benjamin Percy and City of Thieves by David Benioff as the foundational texts for this course.

    Instructor Blake Kimzey founded and directs Writing Workshops Dallas. His short fiction has been broadcast on NPR, performed on stage in Los Angeles, and published by Tin House, McSweeney’s, VICE Magazine, Redivider, Green Mountains Review, Short Fiction, FiveChapters, The Lifted Brow, Hobart, Puerto del Sol, The Los Angeles Review, The Masters Review, Booth, Faultline, FLAUNT Magazine, Malibu Magazine, Day One, Fiction Southeast, Surreal South '13, and selected by Pulitzer Prize-winner Robert Olen Butler for inclusion in The Best Small Fictions 2015. He is a graduate of the MFA Program at UC Irvine and currently teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Texas at Dallas.

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • Blake Kimzey, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 8 students
    • Meets Tuesdays  6:30PM to 9:00PM / June 5, 2018 to July 31, 2018 (Note: Class does not meet June 19th)
    • Class meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    8-WEEK NOVEL I - CLASS BEGINS Tuesday, June 5, 2018

    7 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    This fiction workshop taught by David Eric Tomlinson, author of The Midnight Man (Gallery Books/Simon & Schuster, 2017), is for intermediate and advanced writing students interested in tackling the novel. The course focuses on teaching the fundamental techniques of structure, opening, plot, setting, characterization, dialogue, resolution, and (most importantly) revision. We'll use the snowflake method of building outward from a few basic directional ideas, with the goal of completing a detailed outline and five chapters by the end of the class, when we'll also discuss the querying and publishing process.

    Each week we'll focus on craft, concentrating on both published work and work students have generated for class. Student fiction will be workshopped in a supportive, respectful, and constructively critical environment with the goal of improving an individual’s voice and vision for their piece via traditional elements of craft.

    Each writer will have his or her work critiqued and will receive typed feedback from both the instructor and his or her classmates. A private conference with the instructor is included.

    NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of Steven Pressfield's The War of Art and Robert McKee's Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting, which will be used to illustrate several of the concepts discussed in class.

    Instructor David Eric Tomlinson's debut novel The Midnight Man was published by Gallery Books/Simon & Schuster in 2017 and was shortlisted for the PEN Southwest Book Award in fiction

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • David Eric Tomlinson, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 8 students
    • Meets Tuesdays 6:30PM to 9:00PM / June 5, 2018 to July 24, 2018
    • Class meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    ONLINE 8-WEEK SHORT FORM: WRITING FLASH FICTION & CREATIVE NON-FICTION - CLASS BEGINS Monday, April 9, 2018

    3 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    This ONLINE flash writing workshop is built for writers at any point in their journey (beginner through advanced) who want to focus on creating a batch of short pieces in either fiction or CNF – or both! Currently, there is an amazing abundance of flash being published in print and online. This course is designed to take part in this conversation. Not only will we read, discuss, write, and revise short works, but we will also consider possibilities for publishing this writing. Each participant will have the opportunity to workshop twice. This critique will be grounded on the principles of honesty, generosity, consideration, and respect. Participants will find their own writing and revising getting sharper as they hone their skills at responding constructively to others' work. A one-on-one conference with the instructor via Skype is included.

    NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of Flash Fiction Forward: 80 Very Short Stories and The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Nonfiction as the foundational texts for this course.

    Instructor Cara Benson is an award winning writer whose stories, poems, book reviews, and essays have been published in The New York Times, Boston Review, Best American Poetry, The Brooklyn Rail, Fence, Electric Literature, Hobart, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, 3:AM, and in syndication. She has received a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Literature. Cara is Program Manager for The Millay Colony for the Arts and has been a Visiting Writer for The New York State Writers Institute, Rhode Island School of Design, Evergreen College, Kelly Writers House at PENN, Stonecoast MFA, and Toronto New School of Writing. She has an MFA in Creative Writing from Goddard College.

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • Cara Benson, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 8 students
    • April 9, 2018 to May 28, 2018
    • Course is fully ONLINE; students can work according to their own schedule within weekly deadlines. Once you have enrolled the instructor will send you a link to our online classroom, provided via Wet Ink.

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    ONLINE 10-WEEK FICTION I - CLASS BEGINS Monday, April 30, 2018

    5 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    This ONLINE fiction writing workshop is for beginners with no experience and intermediate students who simply want to brush up on the basics. Through the study of published works, writers will learn to be discerning readers, awake to both the complexities of meaning in a work, and to the strategies and tools the author uses to create a compelling world. The course focuses on teaching the fundamental techniques of fiction — plot, scene, characterization, setting, point of view, and dialogue. Our goal is to study what writers do and apply it to our own writing, making their techniques our own as we go along. In week 1, you'll write your first draft. In the subsequent weeks, writers will work towards crafting solid second and third drafts.

    Though each week will include an exploration of craft and of published work, the central focus will be the discussion of student work. Student fiction will be workshopped in a supportive, respectful, and constructively critical environment with the goal of honing each writer's craft. Each writer will have 2 opportunities to have their work critiqued in class and will receive typed feedback from both the instructor and their classmates. A private conference with the instructor via Skype is included.

    NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of Thrill Me: Essays on Fiction by Benjamin Percy and Ron Carlson Writers a Story as the foundational texts for this course.

    Instructor Nicole Kelly is an interdisciplinary artist and writer based in Los Angeles. She earned a degree in creative writing from Sarah Lawrence College and an MFA from the Programs In Writing at UC Irvine. Her fiction has appeared in ZYZZYVA, Drunken Boat (now Anomaly), Fiction Southeast, and elsewhere, has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and was chosen by Stuart Dybeck for inclusion in Best Small Fictions 2016. She is also a Kimbilio Fiction Fellow.

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • Nicole Kelly, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 8 students
    • April 30, 2018 to July 2, 2018
    • Course is fully ONLINE; students can work according to their own schedule within weekly deadlines. Once you have enrolled the instructor will send you a link to our online classroom, provided via Wet Ink.

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    NON-FICTION CLASSES

     

    8-WEEK INTRO TO THE PERSONAL ESSAY - CLASS BEGINS Wednesday, June 6, 2018

    7 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    What drives a writer to spend weeks, months, years immersed in a topic? It’s one thing to say you’re interested in writing about the world around you. It’s another thing entirely to get absolutely lost in that world – when you no longer just want to research a particular topic: you literally want to inhabit it. In this course, we’ll be exploring wonder and obsession and how those impulses are channeled into riveting essays. We’ll be looking at the way writers inhabit other people’s wonders and obsessions, as well as how they’re guided by their own.  We’ll do this through readings, and most of all, through lots of writing of your own--from shorter essays designed to give you a chance to experiment with different styles and forms, to two substantial personal essays that we will workshop over the eight week session. 

    Each week, we will talk about the assigned readings, participate in writing exercises, and—most importantly—discuss each other’s work. Students will have two opportunities to have their work critiqued (up to 25 pages each time), and they will receive feedback from the instructor as well as their classmates. In addition to providing written feedback, students will also be expected to adhere to respectful and open-minded workshopping standards. No prior nonfiction study or workshop experience is required.

    NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction, edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone.

    Instructor Amy Bernhard is a writer whose essays appear in The Rumpus, VICE Magazine, Catapult, Hazlitt, Redivider, The Toast, Ninth Letter, The Iowa Review, and The Colorado Review, among others. She presently teaches creative writing and literature at the University of Texas-Arlington and The University of Iowa.  She holds an MFA from the University of Iowa's Nonfiction Writing Program, and her work has been awarded grants from The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts and the Virginia Center for the Arts.

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • Amy Bernhard, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 8 students
    • Meets Wednesdays 7:00PM to 9:30PM / June 6, 2018 to August 1 2018 (Note: The week of July 4th this class will meet on Sunday, July 1st to avoid Independence Day)
    • Class meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    ONLINE 8-WEEK INTRODUCTION TO LONGFORM JOURNALISM - CLASS BEGINS April 16, 2018

    CONTACT US BELOW TO BE NOTIFIED WHEN THIS COURSE RETURNS

    In the 1960s, a genre called “New Journalism” exploded onto the reporting scene. No longer was “objectivity” the ultimate journalistic goal; this new sort of writing was chaotic, messy, colorful, in-depth, expensive to assign (ha), and brimming over with the voice of the writer. Its pioneers were writers like Tom Wolfe, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, and Gay Talese; today, its lovechild, “longform” journalism, is thriving on the internet via both old-school publications and websites like The Atavist Magazine, Longreads, and California Sunday. It’s characterized by length (say, 2,000-20,000 words) and by elements of creative writing like scenes, narrative arc, dialogue, and characters. And it’s super fun to write. But where does one start?

    Over the eight weeks of this course, we’ll read some of most energetic, crackling longform writing from the past 50 years, and try to figure out how the pieces work, both formally and emotionally. We will talk about the techniques of longform (do you just, like, interview someone for seven hours and hope a story comes out the other side?) and whether or not objectivity is overrated. Students will also work on their own longform projects, which can range from purely reported to reported-personal to personal-historical and everything in between. (Note that these will not be straightforward personal essays, though.) By the end of the class, you will have your own longform piece that will be workshopped in class and receive private feedback from the instructor. You will also have a better understanding of the current longform scene, including publications to pitch and practical tips for finding story material.

    NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, by Tom Wolfe and The Empathy Exams, by Leslie Jamison.

    Instructor Tori Telfer is a writer and editor based in Chicago. Her first book, Lady Killers: Deadly Women Throughout History (Harper Perennial), was published fall 2017, and called “exceptionally well-sourced and engaging, if gory” by NPR. Her nonfiction writing has appeared in Smithsonian, Salon, Vice, Jezebel, The Hairpin, The Awl, GOOD magazine, Chicago Magazine, The Establishment, and elsewhere, and has been featured several times on longform.org

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • Tori Telfer, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 10 students
    • Meets Online / April 16, 2018 to May 28, 2018
    • Course is fully ONLINE; students can work according to their own schedule within weekly deadlines. Once you have enrolled the instructor will send you a link to our online classroom, provided via Wet Ink.

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    SCREENWRITING CLASSES

    INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING - CLASS BEGINS Tuesday, June 5, 2018

    5 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    This course is for the true screenwriting novice. Have you ever had a great idea for a movie but didn’t know where to begin? It can certainly be overwhelming as screenwriting has it’s own style, rules and format.  In this 8-week course, you will learn the basics, leaving you with a great foundation to write a feature screenplay of your own! We will cover topics such as screenplay formatting, how to properly structure a screenplay, the top 10 deadly sins to avoid when writing a screenplay, and you’ll have an opportunity to write several original scenes of your own!  If you have NO prior screenwriting knowledge or experience, this course is a prerequisite for Screenwriting II and III.

    Note: Most of the reading material will be provided to students, but we do recommend students purchase THE TOOLS OF SCREENWRITING by David Howard and Edward Mabley.

     

    Instructor Rex McGee is a native of North Texas and a protege of the legendary filmmaker Billy Wilder. McGee has sold over 20 scripts for film and television since receiving his BA in Cinema from USC. He has worked in both Los Angeles and Texas as a screenwriter and journalist, and he has conducted screenwriting and creativity workshops at SMU for the last 19 years. His film credits include Warner Brothers’ Pure Country, starring George Strait, the Hallmark Channel’s Where There’s a Will, starring Marion Ross and Keith Carradine, and the IMAX film, Texas: The Big Picture, for the Texas State History Museum in Austin. A member of the Writers Guild of America, West, he has collaborated on his screenplays with directors Jon Amiel, John Putch, Peter Masterson, Robert Mulligan, and Billy Wilder.  He adapted his own original screenplay of Pure Country for the musical stage, which premiered in 2017 at Lyric Stage in Irving, Texas.

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • Rex McGee, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 15 students
    • Meets Tuesdays 7:00PM to 9:30PM / June 5, 2018 to July 24, 2018
    • Class meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    POETRY CLASSES

    6-WEEK POETRY I: POETRY FOR BEGINNERS - CLASS BEGINS Monday, May 14, 2018

    4 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    Have you always wanted to write poetry, but never found the time to give it a try? Or perhaps you aren’t sure where to start, or are nervous to share what you’ve already written? If so, this class is for you! In this jam-packed, six-week course, we’ll read poetry from historic time periods as well as the present moment in order to trace the evolution of the genre and see what’s most popular now. We will also consult selected chapters from Kenneth Koch’s Making Your Own Days, which will guide our weekly discussions of topics ranging from poetic forms and traditions to descriptive techniques and revision strategies.

    Each week, we will talk about the assigned readings, participate in writing exercises, and—most importantly—discuss each other’s work. Students will have two opportunities to have their work critiqued (up to 2 poems each time), and they will receive feedback from the instructor as well as their classmates. In addition to providing written feedback, students will also be expected to adhere to respectful and open-minded workshopping standards.

    Note: Students are required to purchase The Best of the Best American Poetry: 25th Anniversary Edition, edited by Robert Pinsky and David Lehman and Making Your Own Days, by Kenneth Koch.

    Instructor Mag Gabbert holds a PhD in creative writing from Texas Tech University and an MFA in creative writing from UC Riverside. Her work has appeared in The Rumpus, 32 Poems, Stirring, Carve Magazine, Sugar House Review and The Nervous Breakdown, among other places. She currently teaches creative writing for the Graduate Department of Liberal Studies at Southern Methodist University and serves as an editor for Iron Horse Literary Review.

    Fee: $325 for new students; $300 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    • Mag Gabbert, Instructor
    • Enrollment limit: 8 students
    • Meets Mondays 7:00PM to 9:30PM / May 14,  2018 to June 18, 2018
    • Class meets at The Foundry Club at Mockingbird Station: 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln / Dallas, TX / 75206

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    SPECIAL TOPICS

    8-WEEK THE BUSINESS OF BEING A WRITER - CLASS BEGINS Wednesday, May 30, 2018

    5 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    This workshop is for any writer interested in building a career from their writing. Led by Blake Atwood, who’s now in his fourth year of full-time business as an author, editor, and ghostwriter, this class will provide an overview of the many ways a writer can become a working writer in today’s crowded marketplace. Using publishing guru Jane Friedman’s recently released book, The Business of Being a Writer, this eight-week workshop will cover:

    • Week 1: How to build a life as a writer
    • Week 2: Understanding the publishing industry
    • Week 3: Getting traditionally published
    • Week 4: Self-publishing
    • Week 5: Other published avenues
    • Week 6: Establishing your platform
    • Week 7: How writers make money (pt. 1)
    • Week 8: How writers make money (pt. 2)

    The class will also hear from multiple working writers throughout the course, whether in-person, via live video interview, or via a prerecorded message. Each student will be encouraged to pursue at least one aspect of one avenue, like crafting a pitch for an online magazine or establishing your online presence, and will have their efforts workshopped by the group. By the end of the class, a student will have a much deeper grasp of the realities of establishing a career as a working writer and will have taken practical steps toward doing so.

    NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of The Business of Being a Writer by Jane Friedman. 

    Instructor Blake Atwood is an author, editor, and ghostwriter who has been traditionally published as a co-writer and has self-published three books, including an audio book and Spanish editions of his first book. He also works with editing clients pursuing both paths. He is the host of the podcast, All Apprentices: Quick Editing Tips.

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

    8-WEEK DOCUMENTARY WRITING - A CROSS-GENRE WORKSHOP - CLASS BEGINS Thursday, June 7, 2018

    10 SPOTS REMAIN OPEN

    Documentary is a term we most commonly associate with nonfiction film, and with a writer or director’s attempt to capture “the real” in some fashion. Documentary writing, in the form of plays, poems, and fiction or nonfiction stories, shares many processes and characteristics with documentary film. Each attempts to communicate the circumstances of actual events with authenticity, and to translate the lives or experience of others for our consumption. Each can also challenge an audience’s perception of what and who is real, or raise questions about the editorial choices we make in depicting events or experience. This cross-genre workshop is designed for writers of all types who are interested in exploring documentary writing and research methods, and applying them to creative projects. 

    We'll read and discuss a range of documentary texts over the eight weeks of the course -- from those based on transcripts, recordings, letters, interviews, witness, or cultural ephemera to experimental compositions, verbatim dialogue, and other forms of appropriation -- and we'll create our own documentary texts along the way. We will also consider the various ways writers continue to define the concept of documentary in a creative context, whether they are using a journalistic model of reporting, embedding in a culture or subculture, or negotiating the terms and ethics of representation in their writing. 

    Each writer in the course will complete short exercises, keep a research journal, and have the opportunity to present material for workshop twice. The final project (a set of poems, a short play, a short story, or something else proposed by the writer) will be due at the end of the course. Writers may also collaborate with one or more classmates on a more substantial final project if desired. The course fee includes an e-coursepack containing all assigned readings (delivered via email prior to the first meeting), as well as a private conference with the instructor. Each writer will also receive written feedback from the instructor and classmates following the two workshop submissions.

    Instructor Robin Myrick is a writer, visual artist, educator, and consultant based in Dallas. She holds an MFA in Writing and Critical Studies from California Institute of the Arts and is in progress on a doctorate in Aesthetic Studies at the University of Texas at Dallas. Robin has enjoyed a long career as a grant writer and development consultant, training and working with nonprofits at the local, state, and national level, and raising more than $14 million for nonprofits in Texas. She has also written for the Austin American-Statesman, Austin Chronicle, Dallas Morning News, Dallas Observer, and Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

    Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

    Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.