SUMMER 2018 ONLINE CLASSES

All Writing Workshops Dallas instructors are professional writers, teachers and editors, who have taught at major universities and attended top MFA programs across the country. Our instructors are dedicated teachers who have a passion for the craft of writing. Workshops are inclusive and intentionally small. Students will have their work critiqued in an interactive online classroom provided by Wet Ink and will receive written feedback from the instructor and their classmates. Private consultations with the instructor will also be provided via Skype. 

Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below each class or seminar description to ensure there is still room in the class/seminar.

Refund Policy: included in the price of each multi-week workshop is a $100 non-refundable enrollment fee, required for all multi-week workshops. If a student drops a multi-week workshop up to 5 days before the class starts, all but the enrollment fee will be refunded. After the 5-day grace period, there are no refunds, and students will be required to pay the full course fee. We have this refund policy because we keep our classes intentionally small. Dropping a class at the last minute or after the class starts means that someone else who wanted to be in the class cannot participate, and so we don't offer refunds after the 5-day grace period. For a writing workshop to function, enrolled students must be dedicated to the class.

All returning writers receive a $25 discount on any course offering.

CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO NAVIGATE TO THE GENRE COURSE OFFERING OF YOUR CHOICE:

NOVEL | FLASH FICTION | NONFICTION | POETRY

ONLINE 8-WEEK NOVEL I with Colin Winnette - CLASS BEGINS Monday, July 23, 2018

5 SPOTS OPEN

This ONLINE novel workshop is for beginners with an interest in starting a novel and experienced writers looking for guidance and feedback on a new project, or a project in the works. We’ll review the foundational elements of the novel form (setting, character, point of view, voice, scene), using examples from published novels, and looking for instances in our work. With these elements in mind, we’ll focus on the opening of the novel as the place where it establishes its central concerns and primary components. We’ll draft openings for our own novels at the beginning of class. As a group, we’ll look at these openings and discuss what’s being accomplished (what’s established, how it’s working, and what might be standing in its way), while offering constructive feedback for future revisions. The goal of this process will be to help you better understand and articulate your new project’s instincts and inclinations. This class will also emphasize the importance of establishing and maintaining a writing routine, which is critical for the long-term, multi-faceted project that is a novel. Although we’ll work with the larger novel in mind, we won’t concern ourselves with the finished product just yet. We’ll work instead to build a strong foundation that can guide you on your journey toward completion.

Each week will include a brief craft lesson, but the central component of the class will be the discussion of student work. This is a safe place, designed for honest exploration and growth. Student work will be discussed in a respectful, constructively critical manner. The goal is to support one another so that we can more effectively challenge ourselves and our own work. You’ll have 2 opportunities to have your writing critiqued in class, and every student will receive typed feedback from the instructor and their classmates. A private conference with the instructor via Skype is included.

NOTE: Students are required to obtain a copy of Ursula K. Le Guin’s Steering the Craft as a foundational text for the course.

Instructor Colin Winnette is the author of several books, including Haints Stay (Two Dollar Radio) and The Job of the Wasp (Soft Skull Press). His writing has been published in numerous publications, including McSweeney's, Playboy, and The American Reader. He was a finalist for Gulf Coast Magazine's Donald Barthelme Prize for Short Prose, judged by Robert Coover, and he was the winner of Les Figues Press's NOS BOOK CONTEST, for his novel Coyote. His novels have been translated into Italian and French.

Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

  • Colin Winnette, Instructor
  • Enrollment limit: 8 students
  • July 23, 2018 to September 17, 2018
  • Course is fully ONLINE; students can work according to their own schedule within weekly deadlines. Once you have enrolled the instructor will send you a link to our online classroom, provided via Wet Ink.

Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

ONLINE 8-WEEK FLASH FICTION: THE ART OF SUDDENNESS - CLASS BEGINS Monday, August 20, 2018

10 SPOTS OPEN

This ONLINE fiction writing workshop is for those with no knowledge of or intermediate experience with flash fiction. Over eight weeks, writers will examine the constrictive yet artistically expansive form of flash fiction. Participants will read published examples of flash fiction and discuss efficiency of prose, economy of language, white space/subtext, structure, sentence beauty, and debate the importance (or unimportance) of narrative to determine how flash fiction is sometimes story, and other times, perhaps, a reflection of an idea, a thought, a feeling, or stressing the complexity of an experience.

Though each week will include self-paced and peer-discussions of craft and published works, the central focus will be the discussion of student work. Writers will generate four new works of flash fiction (under 1,000 words) that will be workshopped every 1-2 weeks to further flex their aesthetics in a brief space. Student fiction will be workshopped in a supportive, respectful, and constructive environment by both peers and the instructor. Writers will leave class with four new works of fiction with peer feedback and a broader knowledge of the form, setting up writers to continue revising and polishing in the months to come.

NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of Sudden Fiction: American Short-Short Stories by Robert Shapard (Editor), James Thomas (Editor) and Flash Fiction: 72 Very Short Stories by Tom Hazuka (Editor), Denise Thomas (Editor), James Thomas (Editor) as the texts for this course.

Instructor Zachary Tyler Vickers is the author of Congratulations on Your Martyrdom! [Indiana University Press]. He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop where he was the Provost's Fellow. He is the recipient of the Richard Yates Prize and the Clark Fisher Ansley Prize for excellence in fiction. He has been a finalist for the Calvino Prize, the Gertrude Stein Award, and the ProForma Prize. His work has appeared in numerous journals. You can learn more at www.ztvickers.com.

Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

  • Zachary Tyler Vickers, Instructor
  • Enrollment limit: 8 students
  • August 20, 2018 to October 8, 2018
  • Course is fully ONLINE; students can work according to their own schedule within weekly deadlines. Once you have enrolled the instructor will send you a link to our online classroom, provided via Wet Ink.

Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

ONLINE 8-WEEK INTRODUCTION TO LONGFORM JOURNALISM - CLASS BEGINS April 16, 2018

CONTACT US BELOW TO BE NOTIFIED WHEN THIS COURSE RETURNS

In the 1960s, a genre called “New Journalism” exploded onto the reporting scene. No longer was “objectivity” the ultimate journalistic goal; this new sort of writing was chaotic, messy, colorful, in-depth, expensive to assign (ha), and brimming over with the voice of the writer. Its pioneers were writers like Tom Wolfe, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, and Gay Talese; today, its lovechild, “longform” journalism, is thriving on the internet via both old-school publications and websites like The Atavist Magazine, Longreads, and California Sunday. It’s characterized by length (say, 2,000-20,000 words) and by elements of creative writing like scenes, narrative arc, dialogue, and characters. And it’s super fun to write. But where does one start?

Over the eight weeks of this course, we’ll read some of most energetic, crackling longform writing from the past 50 years, and try to figure out how the pieces work, both formally and emotionally. We will talk about the techniques of longform (do you just, like, interview someone for seven hours and hope a story comes out the other side?) and whether or not objectivity is overrated. Students will also work on their own longform projects, which can range from purely reported to reported-personal to personal-historical and everything in between. (Note that these will not be straightforward personal essays, though.) By the end of the class, you will have your own longform piece that will be workshopped in class and receive private feedback from the instructor. You will also have a better understanding of the current longform scene, including publications to pitch and practical tips for finding story material.

NOTE: Students are required to purchase a copy of The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, by Tom Wolfe and The Empathy Exams, by Leslie Jamison.

Instructor Tori Telfer is a writer and editor based in Chicago. Her first book, Lady Killers: Deadly Women Throughout History (Harper Perennial), was published fall 2017, and called “exceptionally well-sourced and engaging, if gory” by NPR. Her nonfiction writing has appeared in Smithsonian, Salon, Vice, Jezebel, The Hairpin, The Awl, GOOD magazine, Chicago Magazine, The Establishment, and elsewhere, and has been featured several times on longform.org

Fee: $495 for new students; $470 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

  • Tori Telfer, Instructor
  • Enrollment limit: 10 students
  • April 16, 2018 to May 28, 2018
  • Course is fully ONLINE; students can work according to their own schedule within weekly deadlines. Once you have enrolled the instructor will send you a link to our online classroom, provided via Wet Ink.

Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.

ONLINE 8-WEEK POETRY I - CLASS BEGINS Thursday, January 11, 2018

CONTACT US BELOW TO KNOW WHEN THIS CLASS RETURNS

This ONLINE COURSE is an introductory workshop in poetry writing for beginners with no experience and intermediate students who want to brush up on the basics. The course aims to help you develop and refine your sense of what you like in a poem—what do you want your poems to do, and how can you make them do it? To that end, we’ll read published poems from a wide range of very different poets, in addition to prose discussions of what makes poetry tick, and apply those case studies to student work. Topics covered include metaphor/simile/conceit, imagery, the use of abstract and concrete language, the poetic speaker as a character, and purposeful line breaks. Although most of the work we'll read will be free verse (the default mode for contemporary poetry), we'll also look at the traditional forms and metrical schemes that are always hovering in the background of the English poetic tradition.

Though each week will include an exploration of craft and of published work, the central focus will be the discussion of student work. Student poetry will be workshopped in a supportive, respectful, and constructively critical environment with the goal of honing each poem's craft. Each poet will have four opportunities to have their work critiqued in class (every other week, up to two poems each time) and will receive typed feedback from both the instructor and their classmates. A private conference with the instructor via Skype is included.

Note: Students are required to purchase a copy of The Poet’s Companion and The Oxford Book of American Poetry as the foundational texts for this course.

Fee: $400 for new students; $375 for returning students. (Payment plans available to returning students.)

  • Jonathan "J.G." McClure, Instructor
  • Enrollment limit: 8 students
  • January 11, 2018 to March 1, 2018
  • Course is fully ONLINE; students can work according to their own schedule within weekly deadlines. Once you have enrolled the instructor will send you a link to our online classroom, provided via Wet Ink.

Before completing your purchase, you must first receive enrollment confirmation using the Register button below to ensure there is still room in the class.